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Student Projects propositions

If you are interested in one of the below projects, Semester Projects, Master Projects at EPFL, or Master Projects in Industry please contact the first person of reference indicated in each description either by telephone, or by email, or by visiting us directly to the LASA offices.


Semester Projects

   
   

Compliance in reinforcement learning for countinous state-action space

Learning by demonstration provides us with a powerful framework to enable a robot to perform desirable tasks. However, real-world demonstrations are prone to noise and other uncertainties; especially, when a teacher (i.e., the person who provides the demonstrations) can only provide sub-optimal solutions. While these noisy demonstrations can speed up the learning process at the beginning, it is favorable if our robot can go beyond this sub-optimality and reach the optimal solution to perform the task. This requires a delicate balance between the exploitation of the noisy demonstrations and the exploration for the optimal solution. As human, one key element that enables us to exhibit this behavior naturally is our physical compliance. When we start to learn a new task we reproduce what we see or are told and thus stay compliant. Reaching a satisfactory confidence in performance, we start to reduce our compliance and search for small improvements.

This concept has been tackled by previous students (https://www.dropbox.com/s/phd70gjouwy84b2/Report_Semester_Project.pdf?dl=0 , https://www.dropbox.com/s/pvg2vrrv8lg226f/main.pdf?dl=0). Their work was done in a discrete world and offered keen insight into compliance. The goal of this project is to extend the work into continuous state-action space in order to bring it closer to actual implementation on a real robotic platform. This is a nontrivial step. We will look at algorithms such as the policy gradient algorithm and the actor-critic algorithm in order to find efficient ways by which to incorporate compliance in these algorithms. If time permits actual implementation on a robotic platform will be considered, starting with simple point-to-point reaching.

The student will need to familiarize themselves with reinforcement learning theory and practice as well as the concept of compliance developed in the lab. A direction will be proposed, but the student will be free to explore ideas which they deem interesting as long as they provide scientific justification for them and they are in line with the goal of the project.

Project: Semester Project
Period: 01.08.2017 - 01.02.2018
Section(s): EL IN MA ME MT MX
Type: 30% theory, 20% software, 50% testing
Knowledge(s): Must have taken a machine learning course.
Subject(s): Reinforcement learning
Responsible(s): Andrew Sutcliffe
 
   
   
   

Adaptive human-robot interaction: From human intention to compliant robotic behavior

Robots are mainly here to assist us with tasks that are repetitive and burdensome. Machine learning and control theory provided us with a variety of techniques to teach our robots to perform such tasks. However, the ability of robots to adapt their tasks to their environment or to the intention of their human-user is limited. Providing robots with such adaptive abilities will unlock new possibilities for assistive robotics. Consider polishing as a task for a robotic arm. The robot learns how to polish from human demonstrations. However, during polishing, the human-user can safely grab the robot and change the polishing direction by applying few repetitions of movements in a new desirable direction. This means that the robots quickly adapts its motions to the intention of the human, thus, assisting him/her in performing the new task.

Previously, as the first step, we proposed a method for adapting the robotís behavior to the intention of a human-user. This method is implemented/tested in simulation, and well-documented here. For the next step, the student will implement this method on a real robot. We will be using 7-DOF Kuka LWR 4+. An impedance controller will be provided to control the end-effector of the robot, and the student will mostly focus on adaptive motion planning using dynamical system. The method will be implemented in C++ using ROS libraries. At the end, we expect a compliant robot that polishes a surface and adapts its behavior (i.e., the location and the shape of the polishing) to the motions of the human.

Project: Semester Project
Period: 01.08.2017 - 01.02.2018
Section(s): IN MA ME MT MX
Type: 10% theory, 30% software, 60% implementation
Knowledge(s): Basic of Robotics and control, and C++ programming,
Subject(s): Physical Human-robot interaction, Adaptive control
Responsible(s): Mahdi Khoramshahi
   
   
   

Learning Manipulation with 4 Robotic Arms

Many industrial tasks require to have several robotic arms working on the same piece simultaneously. This is very difficult as we want the robots to perform the task while not intercepting each other. The joint workspace of the robots is highly non-convex and cannot be expressed mathematically. This project will apply machine learning techniques to learn a representation of the feasible workspace of the 4 robotic arms. This representation will then be used in an inverse kinematic controller to control for the robot's motions at run time. The algorithm will be validated to control 4 robotic arms in the lab that must manipulate objects on a moving conveyer belt.

Project: Semester Project
Period: 01.01.2017 - 15.07.2018
Section(s): EL IN MA ME MT PH
Type:
Knowledge(s):
Subject(s): Robotics, Machine Learning
Responsible(s): Aude Billard
   

Master Projects at EPFL

   
   

Robust Bimanual Reaching motion for ABB-Yumi Robot

To perform many of our daily tasks, we use our both arms (and hands). This fact allows us to have a better control over our environment (better perception, higher precision, higher degrees of actuations, and higher applied forces). Given the uncertainties in our surrounding environment, our ability to coordinate the motion of our arms is extraordinary. Endowing robots with the same ability would increase their performance in the interaction with uncertain environments. Imagine a scenario where the robotic task is to grasp an object with imprecise location (only a probability distribution is available). This imprecision can be due to noisy perceptions or the fact that the object is moving with unknown dynamics. In such conditions, taking the maximum likelihood for granted and performing the task in a deterministic fashion might lead to poor performances and even failures. However, the robot can perform exploratory motions to gain better knowledge about the environment (i.e., a probability distribution with higher confidence for the target) which in turn would increase the performance of the task.

As the first step in this project, the student will focus on the formulation of a simple algorithm for simultaneous estimation and motion planning (using Kalman filters and dynamical system). As the second step, the student will implement and test this algorithm using ABB Yumi robot. The implementation will be done in C++ using ROS libraries where the robot is controlled in position. At the end, we expect a bimanual robot that grasps objects efficiently under environmental uncertainties.

Project: Master Project at EPFL
Period: 01.08.2017 - 01.02.2018
Section(s): EL IN MA ME MT MX
Type: 30% theory, 30% software, 40% implementation
Knowledge(s): Basics of Robotics and control, and C++ programming
Subject(s): Estimation, Motion planning, and Control
Responsible(s): Mahdi Khoramshahi
   
   
   

Learning Manipulation with 4 Robotic Arms

Many industrial tasks require to have several robotic arms working on the same piece simultaneously. This is difficult as the robot should not intercept each other while performing the task. The joint workspace of the robot is highly non-convex and cannot be expressed mathematically. This project will apply machine learning techniques to learn a representation of the feasible workspaces f 4 robotic arms. This representation will then be used in an inverse kinematic controller to control for the robot's motions at run time. The algorithm will be validated to control 4 robotic arm in the lab that must manipulate objects on a moving conveyer belt. It will also extend the approach to enable to manipulate the object under perurbations, such as when the conveyer belt slows down or accelerates rapidly.

Project: Master Project at EPFL
Period: 01.01.2017 - 15.07.2018
Section(s): EL IN MA ME MT PH
Type:
Knowledge(s):
Subject(s): Robotics, Machine Learning
Responsible(s): Aude Billard
   

Master Projects in Industry

no projects




Last update: 01/03/2012